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Is my interface too big?

In this article, I explain how you can detect if the interface you’re using is getting too big and requires splitting into smaller ones. Smaller interfaces help to improve the maintenance and readability of the code. What’s more, it helps with understanding the code. Interfaces in Go are different than those known in Java, c#, PHP etc. In those languages you define interfaces up-front. In other words, at the moment of creating a class you need to know how the class will be used.

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Go with some context

The context package in Go is quite simple and well-known. On the other hand, there are some misunderstandings while using it. Today, I’ll try to explain all the most popular concerns and make more clear when and how use the Context. Let’s start with what the context is. Package context defines the Context type, which carries deadlines, cancellation signals, and other request-scoped values across API boundaries and between processes. ref: https://golang.

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I talk to spammers. Here is what I found

From time to time, I receive an email from a scammer that says he has X million dollars/euro for me. At the very beginning, I removed those emails but at some point, I decided to answer them. Here’s what I found. Every scammer starts very typically. There’s a very reach person who’s dying or very sick. They found my email on the Internet and learned that I’ll be the person who will spend the money wisely.

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Go web frameworks

Go has plenty of different web frameworks. When you are faced with choosing a framework for the first time, it may turn out to be quite a challenge to choose the best one. This article is intended to help you choose the best one. It is full of personal judgments that you may disagree with. However, I believe you will find it most helpful. Martini The first framework is Martini. Honestly, it shouldn’t be here as it’s been under development since 2017.

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Add header to every request in Go

Making changes to all HTTP requests can be handy. You may want to add an API key or some information about the sender like app version etc. No matter why you want to do that you have a few options to achieve the goal. The first approach is building a factory method that will add the required header. func newRequest(endpoint string) *http.Request { req, _ := http.NewRequest(http.MethodGet, fmt.Sprintf("https://%s", endpoint), nil) req.

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Unavailability is fine. Prepare for it

When I started my career as a software developer and published the first production application what I did was staring at logs and look for some fatal errors. It was a monolith application. Every log saying that something’s wrong had to be fixed. ASAP. This approach worked for some time. However, when the scale increased, and I started building microservices, I couldn’t get rid of all of them. Network issues, database failures, and more - it happens all the time.

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Pointer and value semantics in Go

In Go, we can refer to variables using value or pointers. Sometimes, it’s hard to answer which approach is more suitable. At the first place, you should learn about general rules. Value semantic should be used every time when copying the value make sense in the logic of your code. For example, every value object should be passed by value. If you have a struct Money then it’s possible (and also make sense) to have, at the same time, multiple 10$ in your code.

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What you should know about Go slices

Slice is the most important data structure in Go. When it comes to performance, slices are going to beat any other data structure. They are simple but powerful. However, there are some gotchas you have to keep in mind. Today, I’ll explain how slices work to help you prevent some hard to find bugs and write better code. In Go, arrays have a fixed size. The length is part of the array’s type.

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Using sync.Pool

In the garbage-collected world, we want to keep the GC overhead as little as possible. One of the things we can do is limiting the number of allocations in our application. How to achieve that? There’s sync.Pool which caches allocated but unused items for later reuse. The Pool can become very useful when you have multiple parallel operations that can share the same piece of memory between them. The real power of it is visible when you have frequent allocations and deallocations of the same data structure.

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OAuth2 and Go

OAuth 2.0 is the industry-standard protocol for authorization. Go has built-in support for this protocol and today we’ll build a simple application. The application will use the Facebook API to authorize a user. If you need to clarify what oauth2 is and how it works you can take a look at the introduction from DigitalOcean. There are some videos as well. The very first step of building our program is creating a new Facebook application.