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What you should know about Go slices

Slice is the most important data structure in Go. When it comes to performance, slices are going to beat any other data structure. They are simple but powerful. However, there are some gotchas you have to keep in mind. Today, I’ll explain how slices work to help you prevent some hard to find bugs and write better code. In Go, arrays have a fixed size. The length is part of the array’s type.

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Using sync.Pool

In the garbage-collected world, we want to keep the GC overhead as little as possible. One of the things we can do is limiting the number of allocations in our application. How to achieve that? There’s sync.Pool which caches allocated but unused items for later reuse. The Pool can become very useful when you have multiple parallel operations that can share the same piece of memory between them. The real power of it is visible when you have frequent allocations and deallocations of the same data structure.

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OAuth2 and Go

OAuth 2.0 is the industry-standard protocol for authorization. Go has built-in support for this protocol and today we’ll build a simple application. The application will use the Facebook API to authorize a user. If you need to clarify what oauth2 is and how it works you can take a look at the introduction from DigitalOcean. There are some videos as well. The very first step of building our program is creating a new Facebook application.

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Garnish - simple varnish implementation written in Go

The varnish is a well-known HTTP accelerator. As the continuation of the GoInPractice series, today I’ll show how you can build a simple (and naive) varnish implementation in Go. Some of the code is reused from Writing a reverse proxy so if you don’t understand something, I recommend taking a look at the blog post. We’ll split our project into a few parts. The first one will be the caching mechanism.